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Forum: Book Club
 Topic: What the FARK Divergent?!
Re: What the FARK Divergent?! [message #3197912 is a reply to message #3197533 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 05:37
  megs  is currently offline megs  
Messages: 6340
Registered: May 2010
Location: PADARC
This computer will self destruct in 10 posts

Kilanya wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 12:44

Watched the movie.. didn't like how they changed some things, but glad I read the books first. It was OK..

Tris and four were perfectly cast. Theo James is delicious!
Forum: Advertising - Horses
 Topic: Reg arabian pony gelding r.4yo
Re: Reg arabian pony gelding r.4yo [message #3197922 is a reply to message #3195878 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 07:19
  chopin  is currently offline chopin  
Messages: 6208
Registered: March 2011
This computer will self destruct in 10 posts
lovely colour Very Happy
Forum: Breeds
 Topic: Clydie Cross Thread
Re: Clydie Cross Thread [message #3197927 is a reply to message #3195923 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 07:54
  ms tinapink  is currently offline ms tinapink  
Messages: 438
Registered: April 2010
Level 1
Broodmare1 wrote on Sun, 20 July 2014 13:59

index.php?t=getfile&id=600782&private=0

index.php?t=getfile&id=600783&private=0

We went to Werribee last week for a dressage comp; the arena surrounds proved abit much for us Embarassed A level assessor is coming to rally next month so I'm hoping we can move up. Her work is very good, so level 1 here we come!!!

No comps until end of September so lots of training at home Smile


Cal looks as well as ever BM Smile Where is everyone on this thread!?
Forum: Junior Member's Corner
 Topic: Swimming :)
Re: Swimming :) [message #3197890 is a reply to message #3197036 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 00:02
prettypony26  is currently offline prettypony26  
Messages: 26
Registered: December 2013
Level 5
Hi there,
I have been swimming competitively for about 4 years. Also have my swim instructor qual.

The basic strokes are: Butterfly (BF) , Backstroke (BS) , Breaststroke (BR) and Freestyle (FS). All four strokes have diverse but specific techniques in order to do them properly. I suggest if you're interested and keen on improving your swimming and technique, to enrol in a local swim school! Swimming at least once a week will certainly improve your swimming significantly. At my peak swimming career, i was training 6-7 times a week.

In reference to your breathing and kicking query, i would start out kicking using a kickboard to help with your breathing - your kicking and kicking power significantly influences your ability to breathe more smoothly. For the 'flutter' kick, (the kick used in freestyle and backstroke), make sure your tummy and bum is floating horizontal with the water (do not let your core sink), this should bring your legs up and give you more power. Make sure your legs aren't stiff when kicking (bend the knees slightly) but keep your legs relatively straight.
 Topic: Essays
Re: Essays [message #3197907 is a reply to message #3162490 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 03:52
  Jordy16  is currently offline Jordy16  
Messages: 1037
Registered: January 2009
Level 1 - Advanced
I wrote a uni paper on abortion for my paramedic course...There is plenty of info for both choosing to have an abortion, and the choice to keep the baby. Along with plenty of info on the legal and religious rights Smile I managed to write 2500 words on it.... It was extremely interesting, especially when incorporating religious beliefs.


Jordy =]
Re: Essays [message #3197908 is a reply to message #3197907 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 03:54
  Jordy16  is currently offline Jordy16  
Messages: 1037
Registered: January 2009
Level 1 - Advanced
A friend of mine wrote hers on female circumcision in Africa... Not a nice thing to think about, however her essay was amazing.


Jordy =]
 Topic: Anti-Jumps racing opinions
Re: Anti-Jumps racing opinions [message #3197909 is a reply to message #3179486 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 03:57
  Jordy16  is currently offline Jordy16  
Messages: 1037
Registered: January 2009
Level 1 - Advanced
keepingthepace wrote on Fri, 06 June 2014 02:20

If you want to write a good persuasive argument you should also look at arguments that are FOR jumps racing. If you only look for anti- jumps racing opinions you are "trying only to confirm"


Totally agree! Plenty of arguments to support jumps racing aswell!


Jordy =]
 Topic: Marcus Oldham
Marcus Oldham [message #3197933] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:26
  QuarterHorseLover2  is currently offline QuarterHorseLover2  
Messages: 42
Registered: September 2012
Location: Nhill
Level 4
Is anyone here considering going here next year? Or going to the open day? Smile

[Updated on: Fri, 25 July 2014 08:27]

Forum: Showing
 Topic: Stained Numnahs
Re: Stained Numnahs [message #3197934 is a reply to message #3197754 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:35
  tessak  is currently offline tessak  
Messages: 996
Registered: September 2010
Level 1 - Advanced
Mix some Napisan into a paste and smear it on. Leave for several hours, then wash as normal.

You could try Sard wonder stick as well but I'm not sure whether they're ok on wool...?
Forum: Advertising - Noncommercial
 Topic: New Derby Black Helmet
Re: New Derby Black Helmet [message #3197924 is a reply to message #3195275 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 07:22
  daza  is currently offline daza  
Messages: 203
Registered: March 2006
Level 2
Bump
 Topic: 6ft3 Weatherbeeta Cotton Rug
6ft3 Weatherbeeta Cotton Rug [message #3197941] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:43
  subby06  is currently offline subby06  
Messages: 1818
Registered: October 2005
Stark, Raving Bonkers
Used for 1 season and washed. Nice thick cotton, no rips or tears ex condition
$30 plus postage or pick up from Geelong

index.php?t=getfile&id=601071&private=0


index.php?t=getfile&id=487339&private=0
 Topic: part time work 4-6 hrs per week
Re: part time work 4-6 hrs per week [message #3197944 is a reply to message #3197215 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:50
  ezekiel  is currently offline ezekiel  
Messages: 104
Registered: October 2006
Level 3
bump Very Happy
Forum: Dressage
 Topic: WEG Team
Re: WEG Team [message #3197946 is a reply to message #3189981 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:53
  HeidiGA  
Messages: 2442
Registered: April 2007
Location: Mulwala
Troppo. Loco. Round the twist.
Draw for Deaville

http://www.deauville-a-cheval.com/documents/cdi2014_grandpri x_start.pdf

Link to website
http://www.deauville-a-cheval.com/concours-de-dressage-inter national
Forum: General - On Topic
 Topic: Gaiter zips undo themselves
Re: Gaiter zips undo themselves [message #3197892 is a reply to message #3197705 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 00:22
  Superpony  
Messages: 4605
Registered: March 2008
Step away from the computer,
indi3068 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:34

Superpony wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:30

Mine do too. Put a bit of black (or brown depending on gaiter colour) and tie onto the loop on the zipper so it forms a loop. When you zip the gaiters up, feed the piece of leather with the button on it, through the loop before buttoning. That'll hold them up. Hope I've explained that well.

ETA - Hamag zip downwards, or they used to as my old ones zip that way. The annoying thing about that is that it can be quite difficult getting the little zip to connect in to its partner to do them up.


Great idea, so obvious!!

Ill look into hamag's thank you


I didn't even say what I used Embarassed It was a lonely tubular shoelace that had lost its friend.
 Topic: Judge for Bitless Dressage Comp
Re: Judge for Bitless Dressage Comp [message #3197902 is a reply to message #3197404 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 02:21
  spana22  is currently offline spana22  
Messages: 99
Registered: September 2009
Location: Bendigo
Level 3
Mandy was our first choice. Unfortunately she can't make that date Sad

[Updated on: Fri, 25 July 2014 02:22]

 Topic: EA Eventers....in here!
Re: EA Eventers....in here! [message #3197903 is a reply to message #3196918 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 02:26
  flutter_bye88  
Messages: 1838
Registered: March 2010
Location: HPC & MARC
Stark, Raving Bonkers
Bumping for more participants! Smile
 Topic: Have you seen this before?
Re: Have you seen this before? [message #3197915 is a reply to message #3197788 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 06:10
  megs  is currently offline megs  
Messages: 6340
Registered: May 2010
Location: PADARC
This computer will self destruct in 10 posts

One of my horses sheds his coat like that, looks like a moth eaten rug Dead
Re: Have you seen this before? [message #3197917 is a reply to message #3197793 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 06:38
  cheveauxpark  
Messages: 12098
Registered: April 2008
Location: kooweerup
The forum drove me to drink. Remind me to thank it.
Jordy16 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 20:26

Bats79 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 20:24

I've had heaps of horses with minor rain scald this winter. Rugging seems to have "bought it out". I just use diluted betadine.


It just seems so weird that it's really only in the one spot! It has only happened since needing heavier rugging in winter though! Will dilute some betadine tomorrow Smile thanks.


Its prolly where she was most dirty before rugging...
I have a mare who shivvers in the rain/wind but heats up quickly if rugged in anything other than an unlined canvas..I used Canesten cream on her exclusivly..it always worked a treat on this mare...its an antifungal cream.

[Updated on: Fri, 25 July 2014 06:39]


0412954017
 Topic: HRCAV and EA members at PCAV events
Re: HRCAV and EA members at PCAV events [message #3197926 is a reply to message #3195529 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 07:44
  deus  is currently offline deus  
Messages: 200
Registered: March 2012
Level 2
It makes organising things really difficult when the requirements as posted on the website change on a day to day basis Rolls Eyes .

I e-mailed HRCAV yesterday asking if they were going to review their day membership for PCAV /EA members now that those organisations were recognising HRCAV insurance. The reply I received was that they review their insurance requirements each year and day insurance is on the agenda and that they are in contact with PCAV about the matter.

Well, it looks like that probably won't happen now that PCAV have changed their policy (or just corrected the incorrect details on the website)
 Topic: Rescue horses
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197894 is a reply to message #3197816 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 00:50
  MischiefManaged  is currently offline MischiefManaged  
Messages: 38
Registered: January 2014
Level 4
Jordy16 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 21:07

I consider a rescue to be where you have saved their lives...
Eg... If you've saved them from being dog meat or from starvation, then you have rescued them, however if you've just bid against other loving people wanting the horse at the market, then you haven't rescued the horse... Because it's fate wouldn't have been a bad one regardless of if you won the auction or not.



X number of horses will be purchased for meat purchasing on any given day. Purchasing horse Y that was destined for the abattoir only means horse Z will take its place. To me a rescue is a horse that was removed from a scenario of suffering, and whilst I won't claim that the knackery process is painless, it does not cause suffering, and as such, can be seen as a better end for a horse than the old PC tb that starves in the paddock, or the pony that founders etc.


There are but very few men clever enough to know all the mischief they do. - Francois de La Rochefoucauld
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197895 is a reply to message #3197894 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 00:51
  Jordy16  is currently offline Jordy16  
Messages: 1037
Registered: January 2009
Level 1 - Advanced
MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:50

Jordy16 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 21:07

I consider a rescue to be where you have saved their lives...
Eg... If you've saved them from being dog meat or from starvation, then you have rescued them, however if you've just bid against other loving people wanting the horse at the market, then you haven't rescued the horse... Because it's fate wouldn't have been a bad one regardless of if you won the auction or not.



X number of horses will be purchased for meat purchasing on any given day. Purchasing horse Y that was destined for the abattoir only means horse Z will take its place. To me a rescue is a horse that was removed from a scenario of suffering, and whilst I won't claim that the knackery process is painless, it does not cause suffering, and as such, can be seen as a better end for a horse than the old PC tb that starves in the paddock, or the pony that founders etc.


I see your point, and really to explain my thoughts on what is and isn't a rescue horse would take thousands of words to be thorough... However I would debate that it does not cause suffering for the horses... At least for a little while.


Jordy =]
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197896 is a reply to message #3197895 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 00:53
  Jordy16  is currently offline Jordy16  
Messages: 1037
Registered: January 2009
Level 1 - Advanced
Jordy16 wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:51

MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:50

Jordy16 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 21:07

I consider a rescue to be where you have saved their lives...
Eg... If you've saved them from being dog meat or from starvation, then you have rescued them, however if you've just bid against other loving people wanting the horse at the market, then you haven't rescued the horse... Because it's fate wouldn't have been a bad one regardless of if you won the auction or not.



X number of horses will be purchased for meat purchasing on any given day. Purchasing horse Y that was destined for the abattoir only means horse Z will take its place. To me a rescue is a horse that was removed from a scenario of suffering, and whilst I won't claim that the knackery process is painless, it does not cause suffering, and as such, can be seen as a better end for a horse than the old PC tb that starves in the paddock, or the pony that founders etc.


I see your point, and really to explain my thoughts on what is and isn't a rescue horse would take thousands of words to be thorough... However I would debate that it does not cause suffering for the horses... At least for a little while.

The dog meat scenario was just an example and not the be all and end all of horse rescue situations... I had also added that rescuing could also entail saving a horse from a situation like starvation.



Jordy =]
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197897 is a reply to message #3197895 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 00:58
  MischiefManaged  is currently offline MischiefManaged  
Messages: 38
Registered: January 2014
Level 4
Jordy16 wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:51

MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:50

Jordy16 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 21:07

I consider a rescue to be where you have saved their lives...
Eg... If you've saved them from being dog meat or from starvation, then you have rescued them, however if you've just bid against other loving people wanting the horse at the market, then you haven't rescued the horse... Because it's fate wouldn't have been a bad one regardless of if you won the auction or not.



X number of horses will be purchased for meat purchasing on any given day. Purchasing horse Y that was destined for the abattoir only means horse Z will take its place. To me a rescue is a horse that was removed from a scenario of suffering, and whilst I won't claim that the knackery process is painless, it does not cause suffering, and as such, can be seen as a better end for a horse than the old PC tb that starves in the paddock, or the pony that founders etc.


I see your point, and really to explain my thoughts on what is and isn't a rescue horse would take thousands of words to be thorough... However I would debate that it does not cause suffering for the horses... At least for a little while.



I probably looking at 'suffering' from a slightly different perspective. From what I understand, to suffer is intrinsically linked with dread or fear of the a future action based on passed experience. So basically, the first time an animal experiences pain as the result of an action, it undergoes pain but not suffering, however future repetition of the action causes suffering due to the psychological dread/fear associated with the action. Its like how the second time you get a needle is much worse than the first, due to the anticipation of the pain.


There are but very few men clever enough to know all the mischief they do. - Francois de La Rochefoucauld
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197898 is a reply to message #3197897 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 01:05
  Jordy16  is currently offline Jordy16  
Messages: 1037
Registered: January 2009
Level 1 - Advanced
MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:58

Jordy16 wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:51

MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:50

Jordy16 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 21:07

I consider a rescue to be where you have saved their lives...
Eg... If you've saved them from being dog meat or from starvation, then you have rescued them, however if you've just bid against other loving people wanting the horse at the market, then you haven't rescued the horse... Because it's fate wouldn't have been a bad one regardless of if you won the auction or not.



X number of horses will be purchased for meat purchasing on any given day. Purchasing horse Y that was destined for the abattoir only means horse Z will take its place. To me a rescue is a horse that was removed from a scenario of suffering, and whilst I won't claim that the knackery process is painless, it does not cause suffering, and as such, can be seen as a better end for a horse than the old PC tb that starves in the paddock, or the pony that founders etc.


I see your point, and really to explain my thoughts on what is and isn't a rescue horse would take thousands of words to be thorough... However I would debate that it does not cause suffering for the horses... At least for a little while.




I probably looking at 'suffering' from a slightly different perspective. From what I understand, to suffer is intrinsically linked with dread or fear of the a future action based on passed experience. So basically, the first time an animal experiences pain as the result of an action, it undergoes pain but not suffering, however future repetition of the action causes suffering due to the psychological dread/fear associated with the action. Its like how the second time you get a needle is much worse than the first, due to the anticipation of the pain.



I don't think the suffering comes from a pre-existing experience for horses, obviously past events can cause the horse to have a fear of something but I think suffering comes from an in the moment experience for them. I believe the suffering would come from the fear itself of being loaded on a truck, treated roughly, and obviously hearing or seeing other horses be shot. They are not silly, they would know what their fate was going to be.

I do agree that their are worse fates, starving in a paddock, beaten etc... However I don't think that makes the process of their final trip to the knackery any less traumatic.


Jordy =]
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197899 is a reply to message #3197898 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 01:17
  MischiefManaged  is currently offline MischiefManaged  
Messages: 38
Registered: January 2014
Level 4
Jordy16 wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 01:05

MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:58

Jordy16 wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:51

MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:50

Jordy16 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 21:07

I consider a rescue to be where you have saved their lives...
Eg... If you've saved them from being dog meat or from starvation, then you have rescued them, however if you've just bid against other loving people wanting the horse at the market, then you haven't rescued the horse... Because it's fate wouldn't have been a bad one regardless of if you won the auction or not.



X number of horses will be purchased for meat purchasing on any given day. Purchasing horse Y that was destined for the abattoir only means horse Z will take its place. To me a rescue is a horse that was removed from a scenario of suffering, and whilst I won't claim that the knackery process is painless, it does not cause suffering, and as such, can be seen as a better end for a horse than the old PC tb that starves in the paddock, or the pony that founders etc.


I see your point, and really to explain my thoughts on what is and isn't a rescue horse would take thousands of words to be thorough... However I would debate that it does not cause suffering for the horses... At least for a little while.




I probably looking at 'suffering' from a slightly different perspective. From what I understand, to suffer is intrinsically linked with dread or fear of the a future action based on passed experience. So basically, the first time an animal experiences pain as the result of an action, it undergoes pain but not suffering, however future repetition of the action causes suffering due to the psychological dread/fear associated with the action. Its like how the second time you get a needle is much worse than the first, due to the anticipation of the pain.



I don't think the suffering comes from a pre-existing experience for horses, obviously past events can cause the horse to have a fear of something but I think suffering comes from an in the moment experience for them. I believe the suffering would come from the fear itself of being loaded on a truck, treated roughly, and obviously hearing or seeing other horses be shot. They are not silly, they would know what their fate was going to be.

I do agree that their are worse fates, starving in a paddock, beaten etc... However I don't think that makes the process of their final trip to the knackery any less traumatic.


I have a slightly different opinion on the Definition of suffering.

Also, in arguing that horse should not be shot within sight of each other, do you also then believe that horses should not be put down by green dream within view of each other?

The assumptions that the handling of the animals will be poor are not really proper arguments - poor handling can and does occur in nearly every scenario imaginable - there is not innate fear of a truck with knackery written on it compare dot any other (if it is a small dark truck, different story)

I must admit, I drive past a fairly large knackery on a regular basis, and in the week or so leading up to slaughter, the animals look as happy as any horse I have seen on 10+ acres of good grass, well within sight, smell and hearing of the processing sheds.


There are but very few men clever enough to know all the mischief they do. - Francois de La Rochefoucauld
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197900 is a reply to message #3197899 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 01:20
  Jordy16  is currently offline Jordy16  
Messages: 1037
Registered: January 2009
Level 1 - Advanced
MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 01:17

Jordy16 wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 01:05

MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:58

Jordy16 wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:51

MischiefManaged wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 00:50

Jordy16 wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 21:07

I consider a rescue to be where you have saved their lives...
Eg... If you've saved them from being dog meat or from starvation, then you have rescued them, however if you've just bid against other loving people wanting the horse at the market, then you haven't rescued the horse... Because it's fate wouldn't have been a bad one regardless of if you won the auction or not.



X number of horses will be purchased for meat purchasing on any given day. Purchasing horse Y that was destined for the abattoir only means horse Z will take its place. To me a rescue is a horse that was removed from a scenario of suffering, and whilst I won't claim that the knackery process is painless, it does not cause suffering, and as such, can be seen as a better end for a horse than the old PC tb that starves in the paddock, or the pony that founders etc.


I see your point, and really to explain my thoughts on what is and isn't a rescue horse would take thousands of words to be thorough... However I would debate that it does not cause suffering for the horses... At least for a little while.




I probably looking at 'suffering' from a slightly different perspective. From what I understand, to suffer is intrinsically linked with dread or fear of the a future action based on passed experience. So basically, the first time an animal experiences pain as the result of an action, it undergoes pain but not suffering, however future repetition of the action causes suffering due to the psychological dread/fear associated with the action. Its like how the second time you get a needle is much worse than the first, due to the anticipation of the pain.



I don't think the suffering comes from a pre-existing experience for horses, obviously past events can cause the horse to have a fear of something but I think suffering comes from an in the moment experience for them. I believe the suffering would come from the fear itself of being loaded on a truck, treated roughly, and obviously hearing or seeing other horses be shot. They are not silly, they would know what their fate was going to be.

I do agree that their are worse fates, starving in a paddock, beaten etc... However I don't think that makes the process of their final trip to the knackery any less traumatic.


I have a slightly different opinion on the Definition of suffering.

Also, in arguing that horse should not be shot within sight of each other, do you also then believe that horses should not be put down by green dream within view of each other?

The assumptions that the handling of the animals will be poor are not really proper arguments - poor handling can and does occur in nearly every scenario imaginable - there is not innate fear of a truck with knackery written on it compare dot any other (if it is a small dark truck, different story)

I must admit, I drive past a fairly large knackery on a regular basis, and in the week or so leading up to slaughter, the animals look as happy as any horse I have seen on 10+ acres of good grass, well within sight, smell and hearing of the processing sheds.



I am mainly referring to the way the knackery horses are loaded on to the truck at the sales, the times I have seen it, the horses are distressed and rushed.

I wouldn't put a horse down in view of another horse, no. However nor would I ever use the green dream... So I guess the answer is that no, I would never have a horse shot in the view of other horses unless their was no other option.


Jordy =]
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197919 is a reply to message #3197682 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 06:48
  cheveauxpark  
Messages: 12098
Registered: April 2008
Location: kooweerup
The forum drove me to drink. Remind me to thank it.
I worked in an abattoir..
if you think an animal doesn't smell death...
then you're delusional..they certainly do and the last part of the ramp they wanna vacate.
There are better options than sending a poor usless horse to its actual death at a knackery...and anyone can take the option with planning to euthanise other than bleed the last $ from it.
Once the horse is dead calling or even having the knackery euthanise to take away...saves the horse having to go thru its last moments in terrible fear.
I cant help it...I associate the one taking or allowing a horse to go to the knackery to be killed..a tight arsed cold hearted mongrel.
Even the dangerous ones can be euthanised by a quick bullet and still sent off..only differance is they dont get paid for it and horse doesnt smell death.



0412954017
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197921 is a reply to message #3197689 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 07:14
  Isaboe  
Messages: 7714
Registered: January 2009
This computer will self destruct in 10 posts
Last half wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:13

Blocky wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:08

However wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:01

Been thinking this for a while but when is a rescue horse a rescue horse? I hear people often refer to their horse as a rescue but what can this mean? For example I would not consider a horse bought through a sale yard a rescue unless it was grossly underweight or required the next few months under medical supervision due to being neglected.
Or am I just confusing a neglected horse and a rescue? My suspicion is people use the term rescue for sympathy towards their purchase or am I just becoming jaded in my old age?



This. I think we are even seeing private purchases that are being called rescues because they are light on or have bad feet or even because they were spooky so 'obviously' abused Rolls Eyes


Actually more then sympathy for their purchase they are seeking admiration for themselves for being a "rescuer" not just a buyer.

Thumbs Up
Re: Rescue horses [message #3197938 is a reply to message #3197919 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:41
  teetee  
Messages: 266
Registered: October 2010
Location: QLD
Level 2
cheveauxpark wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 06:48

I worked in an abattoir..
if you think an animal doesn't smell death...
then you're delusional..they certainly do and the last part of the ramp they wanna vacate.
There are better options than sending a poor usless horse to its actual death at a knackery...and anyone can take the option with planning to euthanise other than bleed the last $ from it.
Once the horse is dead calling or even having the knackery euthanise to take away...saves the horse having to go thru its last moments in terrible fear.
I cant help it...I associate the one taking or allowing a horse to go to the knackery to be killed..a tight arsed cold hearted mongrel.
Even the dangerous ones can be euthanised by a quick bullet and still sent off..only differance is they dont get paid for it and horse doesnt smell death.





I agree, I've also worked in an abattoir and know that the procedures on paper are not necessarily the procedures regularly employed, for a variety of reasons, not necessarily anyone's fault just the nature of a commercial enterprise.

Horses are highly sensitive animals, they don't smell "fear" as such but they live in the moment and are highly receptive to the nuances of sights, smells, tastes, and behaviour both of humans and other horses. I would not want any horse of mine having its last moments not be as quiet and peaceful as possible. The aged mare I bought was a beautiful sensitive soul, she would have been terrified in a slaughter environment and I think it was an awful thing for her owners to do to send her to the knackery. Sadly many people believe that it is a humane end (which really depends on your understanding of humane, it's a widely misunderstood term which is generally used without much thought into the "how" of a humane death, but that's a whole other topic). Also there are plenty of kill buyers out the who are also dealers, many people may believe they are sending their horse to a quick death but that may not be the case in reality, my mare was earmarked for dogging but she was put through the sale in the case of getting a bit more cash than her carcass would yield. There are many complex factors involved in the welfare of unwanted horses, it's just not that simple. Certainly there are worse things than death at slaughter but that's a pretty empty argument since there's a lot of better fates as well.
 Topic: Assessment of float weights.
Re: Assessment of float weights. [message #3197911 is a reply to message #3197716 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 05:34
  mouse82  is currently offline mouse82  
Messages: 4884
Registered: February 2007
Location: southern tablelands, NSW
Step away from the computer,

Finn wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:48

That's not an answer last half. Does the manufacturer have no responsibility to ensure the weights are correct?

Last half wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:44

Finn wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:38

sprintman wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:33

Last half wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 17:42

Jess_DHAC wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 11:56

Please please please,

Put lasthalf on ignore and stop quoting her, she clearly is a troll and only comes to stir you all up.


Perhaps you would feel more comfortable in the junior section. The depth and importance of this thread is obviously beyond you.


This



You two really need to get a room.

So what if the float weighs different than the tare weight supplied on the compliance plate? That's false advertising also as they advertise it to weigh x amount.



See dusty girls post about ignorance of the law. After a long and no doubt very expensive legal process you might be able to blame it all on the float manufacterer when it all goes horribly wrong, but I wouldn't count on it.



They weigh it without all the removable stuff like dividers etc. so if you have big heavy dividers with rubber drops and head dividers etc make sure you think of them.
Finn you said you weighed it and it weighed a little bit more than the ate said. I'd nearly bet if you took out everything that removable and weighed it, it would match the plate.


If you can't tell sh!t from clay, don't take up sculpting.
Re: Assessment of float weights. [message #3197914 is a reply to message #3194525 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 06:02
  megs  is currently offline megs  
Messages: 6340
Registered: May 2010
Location: PADARC
This computer will self destruct in 10 posts

In this thread talking about float prices compared, only ONE person mentioned tare and GVM and they were in neither spreadsheet (that I saw). That person wasn't Sprintman Laughing

sprintman wrote on Fri, 06 January 2012 13:50

Pity Nathan, Brumby, Otto Tuza, and Olympic aren't there, it would be near perfect.


Seems its not such a common thing when looking at suitable floats Confused

http://vichorse.com/forum/index.php?t=msg&goto=2528809&a mp;a mp;S=fd17a7f7b7e887bed990f9433e31a57f#page_top[/url

[Updated on: Fri, 25 July 2014 06:05]

Re: Assessment of float weights. [message #3197925 is a reply to message #3194525 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 07:34
  Last half  is currently offline Last half  
Messages: 1646
Registered: July 2013
Completely Insane
Has it occured to you Megs, that the "near perfect" as opposed to an its perfect comment might just relate to the lack of TARE and GTM?
Re: Assessment of float weights. [message #3197936 is a reply to message #3197716 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:40
  Dusty_Girl  
Messages: 3331
Registered: March 2009
Unstoppable, ungaggable, unzippable
Finn wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:48

That's not an answer last half. Does the manufacturer have no responsibility to ensure the weights are correct?

Last half wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:44

Finn wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:38

sprintman wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 18:33

Last half wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 17:42

Jess_DHAC wrote on Thu, 24 July 2014 11:56

Please please please,

Put lasthalf on ignore and stop quoting her, she clearly is a troll and only comes to stir you all up.


Perhaps you would feel more comfortable in the junior section. The depth and importance of this thread is obviously beyond you.


This



You two really need to get a room.

So what if the float weighs different than the tare weight supplied on the compliance plate? That's false advertising also as they advertise it to weigh x amount.



See dusty girls post about ignorance of the law. After a long and no doubt very expensive legal process you might be able to blame it all on the float manufacterer when it all goes horribly wrong, but I wouldn't count on it.




Finn they do have to make sure the weight is correct but as mentioned that might not include dividers etc (which I don't agree with but it happens).

What I was getting at is if you have your float overloaded and say it comes off your car and causes an accident and you get sued for towing it illegally overweight then you will not be able to blame that on the manufacturer, because its clearly stated on their website and the compliance plate. If they have provided an incorrect weight for the float then that is possibly something you could take action against them on if the weight varies greatly, but if you're overloaded from what the compliance plate states anyway then you'll probably still be liable yourself..

Wether it is suitable for your purpose or they should have explained GTM better etc before you purchased is a totally different issue, but once you put it behind your car and load it up the responsibility is on you to know that you're towing it legally..

If you are overloaded and cause an accident then just saying that you're not the only one that doesn't understand GTM or that the manufacturer didnt explain it to you will not get you free of responsibility..

That goes for anyone towing a trailer, caravan etc. so not having a dig at you but anyone towing should educate themselves about the legality of what they're towing..
Re: Assessment of float weights. [message #3197940 is a reply to message #3197925 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:43
  djrayment  
Messages: 3743
Registered: May 2009
Unstoppable, ungaggable, unzippable
Last half wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 07:34

Has it occured to you Megs, that the "near perfect" as opposed to an its perfect comment might just relate to the lack of TARE and GTM?

Has it occured to you that you are assuming, which is precisely what you are berating others for doing?
 Topic: First time transporting horse via company
Re: First time transporting horse via company [message #3197935 is a reply to message #3197650 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:37
  Delilah  is currently offline Delilah  
Messages: 147
Registered: March 2014
Level 3
All the best with the move today.
Re: First time transporting horse via company [message #3197942 is a reply to message #3197650 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:47
  Sterling  
Messages: 674
Registered: October 2011
Level 1 - Advanced
The truck just left, thanks to everybody for the great advice and well wishes! Sad to see her go, but the company has been fantastic to deal with and very very considerate regarding the horse's health and wellbeing; I can highly recommend them! Her new home sounds perfect, and I'm very pleased with how it all worked out in the end! Very Happy
 Topic: Towing with a sedan
Re: Towing with a sedan [message #3197891 is a reply to message #3197882 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 00:15
  HeidiGA  
Messages: 2442
Registered: April 2007
Location: Mulwala
Troppo. Loco. Round the twist.
They check as well! (Trailers need a Warrant of Fitness over there which is similar to roadworthy every year to be registered)
Mine failed once on brakes.

edited to add: B-doubles don't come under the 'light trailer' regulations so have slightly different rules.
Cool

[Updated on: Fri, 25 July 2014 00:17]

Re: Towing with a sedan [message #3197906 is a reply to message #3197671 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 03:41
  Equivarna  
Messages: 12807
Registered: November 2006
Location: Misogynists incorporated
The forum drove me to drink. Remind me to thank it.
Depending on model, you will probably have to factor in the cost of some level-rides as well, as the 2300kg BTC is only allowed when using them. $450 on eBay if you're patient.


When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle. Then I realised that the Lord doesn't work that way so I stole one and asked Him to forgive me.”
Re: Towing with a sedan [message #3197913 is a reply to message #3197671 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 05:42
  mouse82  is currently offline mouse82  
Messages: 4884
Registered: February 2007
Location: southern tablelands, NSW
Step away from the computer,

My falcon crapped all over my Nissan patrol when it came to towing. Had more room in it too.

What your NZ info didn't mention until the last line Heidi is brakes. Here all trailers with a gross more than 750kg have to have brakes, which is what allows cars tow bigger weights than they themselves weigh.


If you can't tell sh!t from clay, don't take up sculpting.
Re: Towing with a sedan [message #3197943 is a reply to message #3197913 ] Fri, 25 July 2014 08:50
  HeidiGA  
Messages: 2442
Registered: April 2007
Location: Mulwala
Troppo. Loco. Round the twist.
mouse82 wrote on Fri, 25 July 2014 05:42

My falcon crapped all over my Nissan patrol when it came to towing. Had more room in it too.

What your NZ info didn't mention until the last line Heidi is brakes. Here all trailers with a gross more than 750kg have to have brakes, which is what allows cars tow bigger weights than they themselves weigh.


Yip - NZ allows up to 2000kg unbraked but it has to pass the stop test so no one tries to tow 2T unbraked. They worked out the reality was that to get anywhere near that the trailer has to weigh less than kerbweight of vehicle (braked).

I've just found out our Triton is only kerbweight 1790kg (despite having a 2500kg braked tow rating) so I won't be upgrading to a double with the intention of carrying 2 horses anytime soon!
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