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Forum: Dressage
 Topic: Young horses and nosebands
Re: Young horses and nosebands [message #3237064 is a reply to message #3236826 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 08:27
  Lulu  
Messages: 7747
Registered: January 2008
Location: Still Looking For One Tha...
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berryc wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 11:06

I use Hanoverian straps for kids' monkey grips. My OH who evented to three star is a big believer in a tight Hanoverian strap. I am the opposite. Makes for some interesting chats at dinner.

I use them on gates Cool
 Topic: Xraying dressage horses....
Re: Xraying dressage horses.... [message #3237062 is a reply to message #3236807 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 08:24
  Lulu  
Messages: 7747
Registered: January 2008
Location: Still Looking For One Tha...
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timetorule wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 08:28

Would breeders be prepared to do it though, and what would happen to those with OCD lesions, chips etc, that would be deemed not suitable? Would breeders be prepared to deal with these horses rather than try to sell them on? At a loss to themselves?



They would flog them off to showies and Pony Clubbers where some type of lameness seems to be a prerequisite. Very Happy
Re: Xraying dressage horses.... [message #3237069 is a reply to message #3237023 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 08:33
  timetorule  is currently offline timetorule  
Messages: 334
Registered: August 2008
Level 1
WBS wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 23:03

The amount of times I heard 'had a chip removed' while in Europe fascinated me. Small chips are removed with early detection from X-rays, horse recovers and generally never has a problem and goes on to progress through the levels.

I was thinking to myself that if you mention the word chip here in Aus, the horse may as well be dead or deemed useless. Not the case.

They X-ray everything over there, i think its a great idea.




That is fascinating! certainly something to think about and rethink the perception of "finding a chip".
After all, I myself have had a "chip" removed from my knee and I am still functional (I wont say I'm sound though Laughing )

Are they xraying knees / hocks as well as fetlocks on all 4s as a standard practice - are these the standard joints to xray?

 Topic: Not So Dressage, Dressage horses......
Re: Not So Dressage, Dressage horses...... [message #3237072 is a reply to message #3167139 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 08:41
  Jess_DHAC  is currently offline Jess_DHAC  
Messages: 7499
Registered: March 2008
Location: Central Goldfeilds
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How are we all going? I took my guy to TTT Dressage we came mid to end of the field but. He improved from the week before when we went to Wesburn. These two comps where his third and fourth comp ever so was really happy with him.I have just purchased a new saddle an had it fitted so I am hoping that will help us a lot. I'm also booked in for some lesson with two fantastic instructors both on a monthly basis. Most of all I'm having a blast.


"I'm a self styled Bitch"
 Topic: Trained under kyra Kirklund ?
Re: Trained under kyra Kirklund ? [message #3237103 is a reply to message #3236827 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 11:18
  horsiefun  
Messages: 128
Registered: May 2014
Level 3
I don't know about recently, but Steph Djirkstra (sorry probably incorrect spelling) who also sells for Anky Australia has. Cool
Re: Trained under kyra Kirklund ? [message #3237107 is a reply to message #3236827 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 11:45
  berryc  
Messages: 133
Registered: April 2011
Location: Bunyip
Level 3
I think Steph was actually with Anky?
 Topic: some footage of the 70 day licence testing of WB
some footage of the 70 day licence testing of WB [message #3237039] Fri, 28 November 2014 00:17
  pamela  is currently offline pamela  
Messages: 10066
Registered: February 2006
Location: gidgigannupWA try to say...
Out of my way, I am in the midst of a hoo haa monologue



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhZBYV8o-vk


http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i103/pamelagay/index.jpg
Re: some footage of the 70 day licence testing of WB [message #3237043 is a reply to message #3237039 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 02:46
  TURK  
Messages: 3194
Registered: October 2008
Location: SEDC
Troppo. Loco. Round the twist.
Smile
Thankyou Pamela, I wasn't going to get into a discussion on performance testing on the other thread as that's not what it was about.

Thanks for showing one aspect of it here. Smile

These young stallions would have already have had to pass their X-rays, blood typing, blood tests, in hand conformational assessment and been 'approved' by a committee as 'accepted' to continue to the performance testing for Licensing.

Naturally not all horses pass the initial requirements and not all are approved to undergo the initial riding performance testing for one reason or another.

Approved stallions can also go on to obtain qualification for Licensing before a certain age, based on their own competition performances or based in their progeny.

Re: some footage of the 70 day licence testing of WB [message #3237118 is a reply to message #3237043 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 12:44
  pamela  is currently offline pamela  
Messages: 10066
Registered: February 2006
Location: gidgigannupWA try to say...
Out of my way, I am in the midst of a hoo haa monologue

interesting that the youngest horse was a 3 year old, comments were he was under saddle for only 8 months. The oldest was a 7 year old.

It makes sense to do those tests before you put them in front of a panel of judges


http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i103/pamelagay/index.jpg
Re: some footage of the 70 day licence testing of WB [message #3237128 is a reply to message #3237118 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 14:06
  TURK  
Messages: 3194
Registered: October 2008
Location: SEDC
Troppo. Loco. Round the twist.
Yes, there are a number of ways you can do the ride ability 'performance' testing ie straight after approval, before a certain age, via different forms of competition performance results, hence the variation in ages here.

It is quite interesting when you get into it. Obviously each youngster is different and no doubt breeders/owners feel when it's right for them to undergo the performance results. A 3yo might be in it, but if he does not successfully complete the 70day test, there is prob no reason why he wouldn't be allowed to go for selection at another time based on his performance. Smile
Forum: Advertising - Horses
 Topic: WANTED - My next dressage horse
WANTED - My next dressage horse [message #3237047] Fri, 28 November 2014 06:42
  BirhillieBrowbands  is currently offline BirhillieBrowbands  
Messages: 733
Registered: April 2012
Level 1 - Advanced
I am on the hunt for my next dressage horse. A bit about myself;
I have trained my pony from grade 5 dressage to grade 1 and competed her up to novice dressage, training elementary at home. For the past year I also worked up an out of work wb that had been sitting in a paddock for 2 years, who I have taken out and competed pony club and ea, with hope I would go on with her but unfortunately she is too small and she is now my mums horse. I am 16, and get weekly lessons from an fei rider. Horse would be kept on home property, with safe mesh fencing, arena, stables, etc, will be very much loved!
Horse needs to be:
-15.2 - 16.2
- Gelding preferred however won't refuse mares
- Good temperament and work ethic
- Age bracket of 5 - 10
- Must be good to float
- Horse needs to have basic training, 3 paces established
- Must be located in Victoria
- Price range is fairly wide
 Topic: Excellent eventing or show prospect
Re: Excellent eventing or show prospect [message #3237070 is a reply to message #3235740 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 08:33
  rahni_89  is currently offline rahni_89  
Messages: 885
Registered: March 2008
Level 1 - Advanced
No Message Body
 Topic: wanted-next showjumping horse
Re: wanted-next showjumping horse [message #3237075 is a reply to message #3236983 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 08:55
  sarahp  
Messages: 36
Registered: February 2013
Level 4
Have a look at this guy Smile http://vichorse.com/forum/index.php?t=msg&th=264259& start=0&
 Topic: For Sale: Avlon Dresden
Re: For Sale: Avlon Dresden [message #3237081 is a reply to message #3236333 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 09:23
  vet@ciderhouse.com.au  is currently offline vet@ciderhouse.com.au  
Messages: 595
Registered: August 2010
Location: UBRC
Level 1

Bump
 Topic: I am looking for a companion.
Re: I am looking for a companion. [message #3237079 is a reply to message #3237032 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 09:09
  Samiee17  is currently offline Samiee17  
Messages: 48
Registered: February 2013
Level 4
Were you interested in my boy at all? Smile
He is such a quiet and lovely boy.
Re: I am looking for a companion. [message #3237090 is a reply to message #3236226 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 10:06
Han30  is currently offline Han30  
Messages: 3
Registered: July 2014
Level 5
Yell! Think I missed out haha.
 Topic: Competitive PC or ARC mount **Priced reduced!**
Re: Competitive PC or ARC mount **Priced reduced!** [message #3237097 is a reply to message #3229123 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 10:44
  sarahp  
Messages: 36
Registered: February 2013
Level 4
Here is his pedigree:

index.php?t=getfile&id=608126&private=0

 Topic: 2 yr old stunning Welsh D Cob gelding for sale
Re: 2 yr old stunning Welsh D Cob gelding for sale [message #3237121 is a reply to message #3235200 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 13:30
  Philly  
Messages: 313
Registered: November 2005
Level 1
Video available Smile
 Topic: Wanted on behalf of a friend Galloway gelding
Re: Wanted on behalf of a friend Galloway gelding [message #3237131 is a reply to message #3234947 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 14:13
  sambucca1  
Messages: 2015
Registered: August 2009
Location: Wimmera Equestrian Club
Stark, Raving Bonkers
Very Happy
 Topic: 17.3hh 5yo TB Gelding
Re: 17.3hh 5yo TB Gelding [message #3237160 is a reply to message #3194486 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 16:02
  Combat  
Messages: 6505
Registered: November 2008
Location: Moorooduc
This computer will self destruct in 10 posts
No Message Body
Forum: General - Off Topic
 Topic: Hay delivery?
Re: Hay delivery? [message #3237058 is a reply to message #3237025 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 07:58
  hf15  
Messages: 2063
Registered: April 2011
Stark, Raving Bonkers
billynsox wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 23:09

hf15 wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 11:56

Im in North east vic and alot of the farmers make work of their trucks int he off season by hay carting up north. Usually a B-Double load, but some are just a semi load.
The issue at the moment is it is harvest and the trucks are working 24/7 with the grain so you would be hard pressed to find one the isnt already working.


As an alternative to feeding hay the whole time, also try to source some good clean bales of cereal straw. Offer it ad lib, the horses will graze at it and it keeps their fibre levels up, without using too much hay. Keep offering them hay, but you will find you go thru less when they have straw as well.


Thanks guys, hf15 we actually have a few big square bales of straw hay that we wean calves onto....does it matter what crop the draw hay comes from? Is there any I should stay away from?


I just posted on the other topic, but any cereal straw is fine. I use wheaten straw (im in a wheat growing area), barley is supposed to be sweeter but ita all pretty much the same
 Topic: RMW DFO IN ESSENDON
Re: RMW DFO IN ESSENDON [message #3237083 is a reply to message #3236860 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 09:29
  Shogun  
Messages: 393
Registered: June 2009
Location: Werribee
Level 1
Thanks ~ might still head over then to check it out!
Just wanting a new purse...but I know I wont be leaving with just a new purse....
 Topic: Need Healing vibes for Zarah.
Re: Need Healing vibes for Zarah. [message #3237038 is a reply to message #3237019 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 00:08
  zam zam  
Messages: 12980
Registered: April 2007
The forum drove me to drink. Remind me to thank it.
Rabit wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:48

Hello,
They haven’t ruled epilepsy out yet as those bloods were smears (?) And wont have the results until Monday for that one.
But the cancer may have spread to her brain were not to sure yet.
But she wasn’t on medication all day today and didn’t have an episode.

Oh when it first happened I just dropped to the ground and tried to get her attention.
Then freaked. First thing I thought was snake bite or poison as I’ve never used that shed, old thing with dirt floor.
Thank you for your advice, if it becomes a common thing its going to take some used to not to freak out. Sad

And regarding my mum, she knows that when it comes to the animals the vet is always first regardless if its necessary or not or if I have the money or not. I do, but still.
Told her, That’s why I have the credit card at home in the office for an emergency, all she said was your loss not mine. pffft
They have never had a pet, but just makes me angry and upset their reactions the last 2 days.


Oh don't worry about what others say, family or not who cares!
It's your dog, your money.
I spend more time with my animals than I do any family member which makes my animals far more important to me.
You can really help your dog by staying super calm, do it for the dog and dont worry about your own emotional reaction.
When my dogs fitted people around me would panic and I would be relaxed and soothing as me getting freaked out would not help my dog.
When you realise that you get good at staying calm.


If it sparkles or its fluffy its all good.
Re: Need Healing vibes for Zarah. [message #3237084 is a reply to message #3237007 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 09:36
  jazir1787  
Messages: 10838
Registered: December 2009
Out of my way, I am in the midst of a hoo haa monologue
how horrible for you both!

When you said she came at you, was she aggressive? My BIL had an older dallie that started fitting, and it made him aggressive. In the end they put him down to stop him injuring the other dogs or a person, and not because of the fits themselves.

I think I remember something about epilepsy being somewhat more common in boxers?

Whatever the problem, I hope you can work it out quickly! It's very distressing for you and the dog!


~ My treasures do not clink together and glitter...
...they gleam in the sun and neigh in the night ~

RIP Jazzy <3
Re: Need Healing vibes for Zarah. [message #3237101 is a reply to message #3237016 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 11:08
  mlpc2  
Messages: 7105
Registered: January 2011
Location: the club of me :)
This computer will self destruct in 10 posts
Bonnie wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:43

dotty wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:29

You Know What , its your Bank Balance , Your dog , You life and Your choice , I say go with your Heart and if the decision needs to be changed further down the Track , Then so be it , She looks adorable , They are a part of our lives , not Just an Animal.


^^ All you need.

^^^^ well put
Re: Need Healing vibes for Zarah. [message #3237114 is a reply to message #3237101 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 12:29
  TeganxxGracexx  is currently offline TeganxxGracexx  
Messages: 160
Registered: March 2011
Level 2

mlpc2 wrote on Fri, 28 November 2014 11:08

Bonnie wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:43

dotty wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:29

You Know What , its your Bank Balance , Your dog , You life and Your choice , I say go with your Heart and if the decision needs to be changed further down the Track , Then so be it , She looks adorable , They are a part of our lives , not Just an Animal.


^^ All you need.

^^^^ well put

Exactly this.

No one should make up your mind for you. I recently had my beloved duck on deaths door, everyone was telling me she wasn't worth it, my parents thought it was the best thing ever that she was so sick and wanted her put down. In my heart I knew she had a chance and I gave her that. $700 later and I am so glad I did what I thought was right. I would have been kicking myself if I'd let her go when she had a chance. Go with your gut and don't let anyone tell you what's best for YOUR baby and YOU.

Good luck, thinking of you in these hard times. Sad
 Topic: Cross roads (Life)
Re: Cross roads (Life) [message #3237041 is a reply to message #3235944 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 01:42
  Delilah  is currently offline Delilah  
Messages: 402
Registered: March 2014
Level 1
Sorry b mm but you are going to have to cut all ties with this man his family and friends and sorry but that includes seeing the dog. You need to seriously look at the possibility of moving away to a different state or even country and starting again. Be very very honest with yourself are you using the dog as a reason to see your ex because deep down you still want answers you are never going to get and you are still hoping that you will work it out and be together. That is not going to happen the sooner you accept this the better. Do you have friends you can stay with who live away from all this believe me I left with a pack on my back, no job, didn't know anyone and moved countries. Best thing I did. Time and distance.
Re: Cross roads (Life) [message #3237042 is a reply to message #3235944 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 02:31
  jumping for joy  
Messages: 1586
Registered: October 2005
Completely Insane
He is just hitting buttons on you to get a reaction, attention and control re twisting everything claiming you abused him and the control over when you can and can not see the dog. walk away and do not look back. do you have somewhere to stay?

if a person behaves badly it is a reflection of their poor character not yours
You can not make them behave the way you would like them to BUT you can chose not to be treated like that and walk away.

It is really empowering thing to do Smile
Re: Cross roads (Life) [message #3237104 is a reply to message #3237041 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 11:31
  China bLue  
Messages: 3116
Registered: September 2006
Location: Wyena & Seymour
Troppo. Loco. Round the twist.
Delilah wrote on Fri, 28 November 2014 01:42

Sorry b mm but you are going to have to cut all ties with this man his family and friends and sorry but that includes seeing the dog. You need to seriously look at the possibility of moving away to a different state or even country and starting again. Be very very honest with yourself are you using the dog as a reason to see your ex because deep down you still want answers you are never going to get and you are still hoping that you will work it out and be together. That is not going to happen the sooner you accept this the better. Do you have friends you can stay with who live away from all this believe me I left with a pack on my back, no job, didn't know anyone and moved countries. Best thing I did. Time and distance.



cut all ties, might ne harsh but what are you going to do keep seeing the dog every week for the next 10 years of its life? its not a child, if you want it you will have to take it on or walk away it has to happen one way or another.

Otherwise you are setting yourself up for diaster and as someone mentioned just useng it as an excuse to be involed and a crutch. You have to decide what you want and sadly cant expect it to be nice - break ups especially one like yours never are if people cant play nioce for the sake if chidren i dont hold out much hope when it is a dog instead.
Re: Cross roads (Life) [message #3237111 is a reply to message #3237104 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 12:18
  b_mm is currently online b_mm  
Messages: 59
Registered: May 2013
Level 4
China bLue wrote on Fri, 28 November 2014 11:31

Delilah wrote on Fri, 28 November 2014 01:42

Sorry b mm but you are going to have to cut all ties with this man his family and friends and sorry but that includes seeing the dog. You need to seriously look at the possibility of moving away to a different state or even country and starting again. Be very very honest with yourself are you using the dog as a reason to see your ex because deep down you still want answers you are never going to get and you are still hoping that you will work it out and be together. That is not going to happen the sooner you accept this the better. Do you have friends you can stay with who live away from all this believe me I left with a pack on my back, no job, didn't know anyone and moved countries. Best thing I did. Time and distance.



cut all ties, might ne harsh but what are you going to do keep seeing the dog every week for the next 10 years of its life? its not a child, if you want it you will have to take it on or walk away it has to happen one way or another.

Otherwise you are setting yourself up for diaster and as someone mentioned just useng it as an excuse to be involed and a crutch. You have to decide what you want and sadly cant expect it to be nice - break ups especially one like yours never are if people cant play nioce for the sake if chidren i dont hold out much hope when it is a dog instead.


Completely agree, he said something similar tonight. It's just his blatant disregard for how I am feeling that I cannot get my head around. He saw how devastated I was after mum died yet he does this to me? Takes everything away...I told him last night "you tell me how much my dad caused so much pain, congratulations you continued that pain"
Re: Cross roads (Life) [message #3237112 is a reply to message #3236956 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 12:25
  willowbeast  is currently offline willowbeast  
Messages: 687
Registered: December 2011
Location: Wyena
Level 1 - Advanced

zam zam wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 20:38

How old are you guys?
You sound young.
You threw things at him, you screamed, you had meltdowns, you hit walls.
Maybe he just couldn't cope, that sort of behaviour can be scary to witness.
Sounds like you both behaved badly.
I understand you have been through too much loss and pain.
I get that totally.
Sounds like the timing was bad, neither of you coped with what life threw at you and the relationship is now over.
Not excusing his behaviour but I can see there might be two sides in this situation......


There is NEVER justification for abuse. Smile
Re: Cross roads (Life) [message #3237113 is a reply to message #3236956 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 12:28
  megs  is currently offline megs  
Messages: 6606
Registered: May 2010
Location: PADARC
This computer will self destruct in 10 posts

zam zam wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 20:38

How old are you guys?
You sound young.
You threw things at him, you screamed, you had meltdowns, you hit walls.
Maybe he just couldn't cope, that sort of behaviour can be scary to witness.
Sounds like you both behaved badly.
I understand you have been through too much loss and pain.
I get that totally.
Sounds like the timing was bad, neither of you coped with what life threw at you and the relationship is now over.
Not excusing his behaviour but I can see there might be two sides in this situation......

This was what I was thinking. Just a sad situation all round.
Re: Cross roads (Life) [message #3237125 is a reply to message #3236956 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 13:58
  Bonnie  is currently offline Bonnie  
Messages: 1457
Registered: September 2013
Completely Insane
zam zam wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 20:38

How old are you guys?
You sound young.
You threw things at him, you screamed, you had meltdowns, you hit walls.
Maybe he just couldn't cope, that sort of behaviour can be scary to witness.
Sounds like you both behaved badly.
I understand you have been through too much loss and pain.
I get that totally.
Sounds like the timing was bad, neither of you coped with what life threw at you and the relationship is now over.
Not excusing his behaviour but I can see there might be two sides in this situation......


Having lived through it for 12-13 years and currently escalating again - Doesn't matter if we're young when we've lived our entire lives completely immersed in it.

I mean, I know if I take too much stuff to my head, I react with fists. Doesn't mean I'm reacting any better or worse then them.

Also, if they both behaved badly - sometimes you HAVE to behave badly to stop them and get them to reconsider. Not that they actually reconsider.

They don't realise what they're doing, then when we react from it it's abuse. Just because he's calling abuse, doesn't mean it is.

It may have been both sides, but then one side will always be the retaliator in situations like this. Online, yes, we cannot tell who is what.

ETA: (Blue) Sometimes this is the nicer behaviour to witness. Yes, it's scary, but there's scarier.

[Updated on: Fri, 28 November 2014 14:00]


The word 'good' is a bad word. It is elitist. Good is blind to those who try.

My thoughts are stars I cannot fathom into constellations.

Chantelle xoxo
 Topic: Is there a minimum age for homing pups?
Re: Is there a minimum age for homing pups? [message #3237045 is a reply to message #3237010 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 05:42
  Russinka  is currently offline Russinka  
Messages: 927
Registered: January 2012
Location: GSRC
Level 1 - Advanced
Bonnie wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:29

Glenda wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 14:19

Jess wrote on Wed, 26 November 2014 18:17

Bonnie wrote on Tue, 25 November 2014 21:01

It's illegal under 8 weeks. You need to have vet certification before then and advertising you need a vet's certificate if advertising without microchip numbers whether or not they're being sold microchipped.

Most decent breeders sell between 10-12 weeks,
however most rescues rehome at 8. All depends on the situation.

Some rescues have special licenses that allow rehoming from 6 weeks.



There is a huge amount of socialisation that can be done between 8 weeks and 12 weeks before the first fear period kicks in.

There is plenty of awesome breeders who have their puppies in their new homes at 8 weeks. It's hard work fully socialising a litter of even 4 or 5 puppies, let alone making a start on their training.

No way would I buy a puppy from a breeder who doesn't let them go at 8 weeks unless there was a really good reason for it i.e. air travel or quarantine.

Looks like another topic Bonnie is an expert at.....no Bonnie...most breeders send their pups to their new homes at 8 weeks unless they have to be flown somewhere .....puppies are generally weaned and away from their mothers by 6 weeks and they spend 2 weeks with their litter mates....they have their injections around 7 weeks and usually a week later they go to their new homes ...8 - 12 weeks is a very important time to start socialising and training.....and to be very honest...by that time you need to move them on for your own sanity....its hard work feeding and cleaning up after 6 or 8 little monsters jumping all over you with pooey feet Laughing


I guess living next door to a high end stud that runs a well-known breeding group attributes absolutely nothing when you've got glenda on the scene too.


Pretty sure I live next to a meth lab.... doesn't actually mean I'd be able to make it....
Re: Is there a minimum age for homing pups? [message #3237050 is a reply to message #3237010 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 07:29
  Glenda  
Messages: 27430
Registered: October 2005
The forum drove me to drink. Remind me to thank it.
Bonnie wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:29

Glenda wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 14:19

Jess wrote on Wed, 26 November 2014 18:17

Bonnie wrote on Tue, 25 November 2014 21:01

It's illegal under 8 weeks. You need to have vet certification before then and advertising you need a vet's certificate if advertising without microchip numbers whether or not they're being sold microchipped.

Most decent breeders sell between 10-12 weeks,
however most rescues rehome at 8. All depends on the situation.

Some rescues have special licenses that allow rehoming from 6 weeks.



There is a huge amount of socialisation that can be done between 8 weeks and 12 weeks before the first fear period kicks in.

There is plenty of awesome breeders who have their puppies in their new homes at 8 weeks. It's hard work fully socialising a litter of even 4 or 5 puppies, let alone making a start on their training.

No way would I buy a puppy from a breeder who doesn't let them go at 8 weeks unless there was a really good reason for it i.e. air travel or quarantine.

Looks like another topic Bonnie is an expert at.....no Bonnie...most breeders send their pups to their new homes at 8 weeks unless they have to be flown somewhere .....puppies are generally weaned and away from their mothers by 6 weeks and they spend 2 weeks with their litter mates....they have their injections around 7 weeks and usually a week later they go to their new homes ...8 - 12 weeks is a very important time to start socialising and training.....and to be very honest...by that time you need to move them on for your own sanity....its hard work feeding and cleaning up after 6 or 8 little monsters jumping all over you with pooey feet Laughing


I guess living next door to a high end stud that runs a well-known breeding group attributes absolutely nothing when you've got glenda on the scene too.

So what if you live next door, I work next door to a company that builds caravans doesn't mean I know how to build one......Every time I open VH you are here giving advice on any and all subjects, which is fine if you know what you are talking about, but for someone so young I doubt you have the life experience to know as much as you think you do......as for this subject it is something I do know about having been in involved with breeding and showing long before you were even born, as for your other gem, you gave totally incorrect advice on how to introduce dogs which could have ended in disaster had the OP taken your advice, yes it may have worked for you and yes in some dogs it isn't a problem but for many dogs having them on lead and allowing them to eyeball each other from a distance can turn nasty and anyone who is involved with dogs knows or should know this.
Bonnie by all means get involved on here, have an opinion but don't give advice if you really don't know what you are talking about, I would never offer advice on horses because I know very little about them even though I have 4 of them.....but I have learnt a hell of a lot just reading this forum for over 10 years and asking questions
Re: Is there a minimum age for homing pups? [message #3237082 is a reply to message #3237050 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 09:26
  Beaucroft  is currently offline Beaucroft  
Messages: 90
Registered: June 2010
Location: Berwick
Level 3
Hi, I've been breeding Golden Retriever for 34 years & the general rule of thumb for our breed is going to their new homes at 8 weeks old. I personally keep mine to 9 weeks choosing to have them vaccinated at 8 weeks & keeping them to make sure that they have not had a reaction to the injection &/or microchip. Again personally I do not like vaccinating my pups until they are a little older but most or some still vaccinate at 6-7 weeks.

Dog Victoria have rules in place outlining that puppies can not leave the breeders premises before 8 weeks old. In saying this I know a lot of breeders in smaller (Toy) breeds keep them to 10-12 weeks old.

In regards to socialising, an experienced breeder will certainly have a hand on this & the pups will not suffer because of the extra time spent with the breeder. I know my pups certainly do not & are happy outgoing pups.

If you are buying a unregistered pup from a pet shop or backyard breeder they generally do what they want to as they are not bound by any rules & regulations.

I hope that this has helped some.



Re: Is there a minimum age for homing pups? [message #3237085 is a reply to message #3237082 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 09:37
  Glenda  
Messages: 27430
Registered: October 2005
The forum drove me to drink. Remind me to thank it.
Beaucroft wrote on Fri, 28 November 2014 09:26

Hi, I've been breeding Golden Retriever for 34 years & the general rule of thumb for our breed is going to their new homes at 8 weeks old. I personally keep mine to 9 weeks choosing to have them vaccinated at 8 weeks & keeping them to make sure that they have not had a reaction to the injection &/or microchip. Again personally I do not like vaccinating my pups until they are a little older but most or some still vaccinate at 6-7 weeks.

Dog Victoria have rules in place outlining that puppies can not leave the breeders premises before 8 weeks old. In saying this I know a lot of breeders in smaller (Toy) breeds keep them to 10-12 weeks old.

In regards to socialising, an experienced breeder will certainly have a hand on this & the pups will not suffer because of the extra time spent with the breeder. I know my pups certainly do not & are happy outgoing pups.

If you are buying a unregistered pup from a pet shop or backyard breeder they generally do what they want to as they are not bound by any rules & regulations.

I hope that this has helped some.





I dont disagree with this...what I took umbrage too was the comment......most decent breeders sell between 10 -12 weeks which is complete rubbish....that implies that you and I and most breeders I know are not decent......I have on a few occasions kept a pup till 8.5 to 9 weeks as often owners may not be in the position to take the pup right on 8 weeks...most like to take them on a weekend so they have the whole family around to be with the pup.....there is no hard and fast rule....we all have our own take on it but generally speaking most registered breeders let the pups go at 8 weeks ..
Re: Is there a minimum age for homing pups? [message #3237124 is a reply to message #3237045 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 13:53
  Bonnie  is currently offline Bonnie  
Messages: 1457
Registered: September 2013
Completely Insane
Russinka wrote on Fri, 28 November 2014 05:42

Bonnie wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:29

Glenda wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 14:19

Jess wrote on Wed, 26 November 2014 18:17

Bonnie wrote on Tue, 25 November 2014 21:01

It's illegal under 8 weeks. You need to have vet certification before then and advertising you need a vet's certificate if advertising without microchip numbers whether or not they're being sold microchipped.

Most decent breeders sell between 10-12 weeks,
however most rescues rehome at 8. All depends on the situation.

Some rescues have special licenses that allow rehoming from 6 weeks.



There is a huge amount of socialisation that can be done between 8 weeks and 12 weeks before the first fear period kicks in.

There is plenty of awesome breeders who have their puppies in their new homes at 8 weeks. It's hard work fully socialising a litter of even 4 or 5 puppies, let alone making a start on their training.

No way would I buy a puppy from a breeder who doesn't let them go at 8 weeks unless there was a really good reason for it i.e. air travel or quarantine.

Looks like another topic Bonnie is an expert at.....no Bonnie...most breeders send their pups to their new homes at 8 weeks unless they have to be flown somewhere .....puppies are generally weaned and away from their mothers by 6 weeks and they spend 2 weeks with their litter mates....they have their injections around 7 weeks and usually a week later they go to their new homes ...8 - 12 weeks is a very important time to start socialising and training.....and to be very honest...by that time you need to move them on for your own sanity....its hard work feeding and cleaning up after 6 or 8 little monsters jumping all over you with pooey feet Laughing


I guess living next door to a high end stud that runs a well-known breeding group attributes absolutely nothing when you've got glenda on the scene too.


Pretty sure I live next to a meth lab.... doesn't actually mean I'd be able to make it....


For those who have read 3/4 of my posts, you'd have remembered that I spend 9/10ths of my time at my neighbours...

ETA: Booby trapped school computers

[Updated on: Fri, 28 November 2014 13:53]


The word 'good' is a bad word. It is elitist. Good is blind to those who try.

My thoughts are stars I cannot fathom into constellations.

Chantelle xoxo
Re: Is there a minimum age for homing pups? [message #3237133 is a reply to message #3237045 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 14:29
  Applet  is currently offline Applet  
Messages: 484
Registered: March 2011
Location: Anglesea
Level 1
Russinka wrote on Fri, 28 November 2014 05:42

Bonnie wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 22:29

Glenda wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 14:19

Jess wrote on Wed, 26 November 2014 18:17

Bonnie wrote on Tue, 25 November 2014 21:01

It's illegal under 8 weeks. You need to have vet certification before then and advertising you need a vet's certificate if advertising without microchip numbers whether or not they're being sold microchipped.

Most decent breeders sell between 10-12 weeks,
however most rescues rehome at 8. All depends on the situation.

Some rescues have special licenses that allow rehoming from 6 weeks.



There is a huge amount of socialisation that can be done between 8 weeks and 12 weeks before the first fear period kicks in.

There is plenty of awesome breeders who have their puppies in their new homes at 8 weeks. It's hard work fully socialising a litter of even 4 or 5 puppies, let alone making a start on their training.

No way would I buy a puppy from a breeder who doesn't let them go at 8 weeks unless there was a really good reason for it i.e. air travel or quarantine.

Looks like another topic Bonnie is an expert at.....no Bonnie...most breeders send their pups to their new homes at 8 weeks unless they have to be flown somewhere .....puppies are generally weaned and away from their mothers by 6 weeks and they spend 2 weeks with their litter mates....they have their injections around 7 weeks and usually a week later they go to their new homes ...8 - 12 weeks is a very important time to start socialising and training.....and to be very honest...by that time you need to move them on for your own sanity....its hard work feeding and cleaning up after 6 or 8 little monsters jumping all over you with pooey feet Laughing


I guess living next door to a high end stud that runs a well-known breeding group attributes absolutely nothing when you've got glenda on the scene too.


Pretty sure I live next to a meth lab.... doesn't actually mean I'd be able to make it....


Have you watched "Breaking Bad"? Maybe you could make it... Laughing Laughing Shocked
Re: Is there a minimum age for homing pups? [message #3237141 is a reply to message #3236893 ] Fri, 28 November 2014 14:58
  Stockhorse  
Messages: 2396
Registered: February 2012
Stark, Raving Bonkers
djrayment wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 16:42

Glenda wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 15:27

djrayment wrote on Thu, 27 November 2014 14:21

Jess wrote on Wed, 26 November 2014 18:17

Bonnie wrote on Tue, 25 November 2014 21:01

It's illegal under 8 weeks. You need to have vet certification before then and advertising you need a vet's certificate if advertising without microchip numbers whether or not they're being sold microchipped.

Most decent breeders sell between 10-12 weeks, however most rescues rehome at 8. All depends on the situation.

Some rescues have special licenses that allow rehoming from 6 weeks.



There is a huge amount of socialisation that can be done between 8 weeks and 12 weeks before the first fear period kicks in.

There is plenty of awesome breeders who have their puppies in their new homes at 8 weeks. It's hard work fully socialising a litter of even 4 or 5 puppies, let alone making a start on their training.

No way would I buy a puppy from a breeder who doesn't let them go at 8 weeks unless there was a really good reason for it i.e. air travel or quarantine.

It's not really a cut and dried topic, because the info about development of bite inhibition and dog-dog socialisation points towards 10 weeks being optimal (allows for proper development of both BI and early social skills, as well as getting pups into pet homes early enough for them to integrate easily and still have a good socialisation window).

That said, many working dog people aren't overly interested in nuanced dog-dog socialisation or bite inhibition but are have strict requirements for environmental socialisation, so want pups much earlier (even as early as 6 weeks). To the contrary, many well-selected companion breeds are environmentally stable enough (crap term, but most people understand it) to have very limited intense socialisation and still be fine - in those cases, dog-dog socialisation skills and bite inhibition are way up the list of what's required for the adult dog so it makes NO sense to get the dog before around 10 weeks.

I would suggest to anyone that's considering buying a puppy to speak to the breeder and see what they have to say. If they are defaulting to hard and fast rules like they are the law, or haven't put enough thought into it to be able to give you a well reasoned answer about what's best for THEIR pups and YOUR circumstances, I'd personally suggest going elsewhere.

whilst I bow to your educational knowledge Di...on this I beg to differ....we found pups sent home at 8 weeks settled much faster than those a little bit older..of course breeders will often hold a pup if the new owners circumstances doesnt allow for an 8 week homecoming.....I guess Di its a bit like babies....there are many many books written by experts who have done all the studies etc but when it comes down to it.....babies dont read books and neither do puppies.... Very Happy

That's not contradicting the books at all, Glenda. As above, the extra couple of weeks is for the development of bite inhibition and dog-dog social skills, not an ability to adapt to a new home or be around new people. Most average pet owners don't really think that far ahead when reporting how the early life of a pup affects the adult it grows into, and most people would have no clue how bite inhibited their dog is (usually unless they've been on the receiving end for some reason), so I wouldn't expect puppy buyers to notice a lot of difference in those two factors.

As someone who has trained quite a few dogs, I can say that in my experience pusp who are rehomed early are more likely to have dog-dog issues and hard mouths, IME the experts are right on the money with this one.

Wouldn't that depend on whether they are going to a single dog home or multiple dogs? Surely a new home with other dogs would provide that socialization.
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